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西法特西法特
Aug 01, 2022
In Wellness Forum
5 filtered report Still, it’s important not to get too carried away by your average bounce rate because popular pages skew that number. It’s better to check the median bounce rate, which is 46.78% here (the filtered report has 15 pages, so the 8th page contains the median value). If a page has a higher than median bounce rates, it may be a sign that: The page needs a better user experience (you’ll learn what to focus on later) Your title tag and/or meta description doesn’t align with your page’s content, so users leave. The same can apply to ad copy for your performance channels. It’s a type of page where people bounce naturally. Let me expand on the third point. Imagine that you’re looking up contact information for a company. You Google “{company} contact,” click-through and write an email or call them. The page provided all you needed, yet you most likely bounced. There are even categories of pages that will naturally generate bounces yet satisfy the user. Think about recipes. You usually look them up when you need them. You probably won’t jump from a carbonara recipe to a pizza dough recipe even if they’re linked together. You only want to cook the pasta. You always need to think about the actual content on the page and why people land on it. But at the end of the day, you’re still doing quantitative analysis. You’ll get more insights by analyzing actual user behavior. We’ll touch more on the topic of qualitative analysis at the end of this article. All in all, these tips apply to any metric, not just bounce rate. You need to know how they’re measured, what they really mean, and use them in the right context. What is a good bounce rate? According to the general consensus, a bounce rate of 40 to 60% is considered average so anything below 40% would be good. However, there’s no evidence and reasoning behind those numbers. The reality is that there’s no such thing as a universally good bounce rate. Bounce rates significantly differ between landing pages and their traffic sources as there are many marketing channels and multiple phases of the customer journey. For example, here’s the performance for Google’s Merchandise Store homepage segmented by marketing channel: 6 filtered report The bounce rates for “google / cpc” and “partners / affiliate” differ by 36 percentage points, or 133%. And there are bigger difference gaps than this, too. If we look at things the other way around, we can see how landing page bounce rates differ for a particular traffic source: 6 segment by marketing channel Here, bounce rates fluctuate between 35% and 85% for “google / organic” on the ten most-visited landing pages. The takeaway? Forget about X% being good and Y% being bad. It’s about looking at the data from the right angle, as shown before. Why you can have a “bad bounce rate” No, I’m not contradicting myself. It’s more like “wrong bounce rate” than “bad bounce rate” because data can sometimes be skewed and inaccurate. If you see bounce rates that seem way too high or low, this is probably the case, and you should investigate your analytics setup for tracking mistakes. Here are just a few common problems: Duplicate tracking code. Are all your bounce rates zero or close-to-zero? You almost certainly have an issue with duplicate tracking codes. Here’s how to fix it. Incorrectly set up interaction events. Events in Google Analytics are interactive by default. If you use them, make sure to switch this off for minor events (e.g., scroll depth tracking). Learn how to handle events properly here. Not firing virtual pageviews on JavaScript-heavy websites. You need to implement something called virtual pageviews if you don’t want your bounces to be skewed. Learn more here. How to improve your bounce rate It’s a straightforward question, but not the best one to ask. That’s because bounce rate isn’t related to your marketing or business objectives. A better question to ask is how you improve user engagement. After all, the more engaged users are, the lower your bounce rates will be. Here are seven actionable ways to improve user engagement, experience, and potentially bounce rates: Give people what they came for Improve your copywriting Be mobile-friendly Moderate your ads, pop-ups and interstitials Improve your internal linking Improve your site speed Focus on everything else related to user experience 1. Give people what they came for People are impatient. If they don’t feel that your page offers what they were looking for within seconds of landing there, they’ll hit the back button in search of one that does. Improve your chances of people sticking around by giving them what they want, and fast. Most recipe sites offer a prime example of what not to do here. Everyone’s there for the recipe, yet bloggers like to give you their life story first. You have to scroll past the history of the dish, a bunch of affiliated products, and a few not-so-humble brags about that time they visited Italy and had the most delicious carbonara ever and, yeah…. bounce! Use the inverted pyramid method to stop yourself from falling into this trap. Start with the “need to know,” then cover the “nice to know” later. 7 inverted pyramid 2. Improve your copywriting If users struggle to read your content easily, they’ll be more likely to bounce. Keep things simple, and don’t feel the need to use fancy words, complex sentences, and other jargon to make your content better. Most people won’t thank you for it. Recommended reading: 12 Easy SEO Copywriting Tips for Better Content and Higher Rankings 3. Be mobile-friendly Most websites get the majority of their visitors from mobile, so it’s super-important that your site is optimized for smaller screens. That means having intuitive navigation, large font and image sizes, and as little clutter as possible. Here’s a shameless plug of our own homepage viewed on mobile to show how to do it right: The workload like this whatsapp number list allows both the vendor and the affiliate to focus on. Clicks are the number of clicks coming to your website’s URL from organic search results. 4. Moderate your ads, pop-ups and interstitials When I see something like this upon loading a page, I bounce right away: 8 recipe bad ux This is the kind of clutter I mentioned in the previous point. It’s especially annoying on mobile, where it occupies most of the screen, and where it’s often near-impossible to hit the “X” button. If you have these on your site and don’t want to give them up, at least moderate the number of advertisements and trigger the pop-ups and interstitials only after the user has completed specific actions. For example, if you have a pop-up for your newsletter signup, show it to people only after they’ve consumed some of your content or when they’re about to leave your website. It’ll probably convert better that way too. 5. Improve your internal linking
Improve your internal linking content media
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